Browse Entries: D

there are 486 entries under the letter D

D'Sonoqua

1. n.

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dag

1. n. See 1859 quote.

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dague

1. n. See dag 1859 quote.

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Dahl sheep

1.

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dainty

1. n. cookie, pastry or cake better than the everyday fare; usually in the plural, dainties.

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Dall

1. n. the white sheep, Ovis dalli, of the mountains of the Northwest.

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Dall sheep

1. the white sheep, Ovis dalli, of the mountains of the Northwest.

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dalle

1. n. a smooth flume or artificial slide for floating logs.

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dam ((1))

1. n. a dam built by beavers to maintain a constant water level above their lodge.

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dam ((2))

1. n. a large shallow excavation intended to hold the spring run-off and rain, serving as a reservoir.

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damper

1. n. a kind of bannock.

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dan

1. n. a sealskin bag used as a buoy or float.

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dance hall

1. a building used for public dancing.

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dance house

1. among Indians and Eskimos, a large structure where communal dancing is performed.

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dance-hall girl

1. in frontier days, a woman employed in a saloon or dance-hall, ostensibly to serve as a dancing partner for male clients.

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dancing booth

1. in pioneer days, a structure serving as a temporary dance hall.

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dancing girl

1. in frontier days, a woman employed in a saloon or dance-hall, ostensibly to serve as a dancing partner for male clients

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dancing ground

1. a well-worn patch of elevated prairie where prairie chickens habitually congregate for their mating ritual or dance.

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dancing lodge

1. among Indians and Eskimos, a large structure where communal dancing is performed.

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dancing tent

1. a special tent or tepee in which Indians performed ceremonial dances.

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dangerous offender

1. n. a convicted criminal, who, deemed too dangerous to be released, may be kept incarcerated for an indefinite period of time.

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dangle

1. v. to skillfully maneuver through the opposition.

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dark oil

1. See quotes.

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dark spell

1. the winter darkness in the Arctic regions.

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dasher

1. n. the enclosing fence of a hockey rink; the boards.

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date

1. n. a news dispatch (of a specified date).

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Davidite

1. n. See 1837 quote.

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Davis raft

1. an ocean-going raft constructed of layers of logs, used mostly for short tows.

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Davis water wheel

1. a large wheel (about 20 feet in diameter) having buckets on the rim and used in placer mining to operate a pump to keep the workings dry.

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davy-man

1. n. a prisoner taken from a captured vessel and made to swear an affidavit before Admiralty Court that the vessel taken was legitimate prey for privateers.

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Dawson caribou

1. an extinct sub-species of caribou (def. 1), Rangifer torandus dawsoni, found only on Graham Island of the Queen Charlotte Islands.

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Dawson highway

1.

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Dawson road

1.

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Dawson route

1. a road and water route from Fort William to Fort Garry, recommended by Simon J. Dawson, a Canadian engineer, after an exploration trip in 1857-9, the first leg of a proposed trans-Canada highway.

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day camp

1. a summer camp which young people attend only during the daytime, returning to their homes each night.

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day parole

1. n. short-term approved leaves for prisoners nearing release.

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dayliner

1. n. a self-driven express train of one or more coaches travelling daily between two cities.

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de Meuron

1. See 1938 quote.

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deacon seat

1. a long bench in a bunkhouse, especially in a lumber camp.

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deacon's nose

1. the broad lobe of a chicken, turkey, etc. which corresponds to a mammal's tail and which serves as a base for the tail-feathers; the pope's nose.

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dead lodge

1. a teepee in which those dead from disease were abandoned.

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dead stand timber

1. n. dead trees that remain standing.

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dead water(s)

1. a region characterized by sluggish, muddy streams, marsh, muskeg, etc.; also, the sluggish streams and ponds found there.

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deadfall ((adj.))

1. of trees, downed by wind, disease, or age.

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deadfall ((n.))

1. a kind of animal trap. See 1853 quote.

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deadfall trap

1. a kind of animal trap. See picture at deadfall n.

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deadfallen

1.

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deadhead

1. n. a water-soaked log partly or entirely submerged, usually with one end embedded in the bottom.

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deadman

1. n. one of two series of converging objects, such as posts, piles of turf, large upright stones, forming a funnel into which big game, such as buffalo, were driven into a pound for slaughter.

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deadwood

1. n. a tall, dead tree, especially one that is blackened and branchless from being caught in a forest fire.

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deadwood fence

1. a fence constructed of the brush and deadfalls taken from the clearing of land.

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dealer

1. n. a trapper or other person who receives advances on his catch and undertakes to bring it to the store giving him the advances.

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dealing settler

1. a storekeeper in a new settlement.

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death song

1. a dirge sung by or for an Indian at the time of his death.

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death teepee

1. a teepee in which those dead from disease were abandoned.

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Death Trail

1. See Long Traverse.

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deathfall

1. n. a kind of animal trap. See deadfall.

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debt

1. n. credit extended to hunters and trappers in the form of supplies to be paid for out of the coming year's catch.

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debtor

1. n. a person taking debt at a trading post.

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deck ((n.))

1. n. a pile of logs ready for driving or hauling.

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deck ((v.))

1. v. pile up logs ready for driving or hauling.

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deck passenger

1. a passenger on a steamboat travelling at the lowest rate on the deck, often providing his own food and bedding.

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declaration day

1. the day on which the official count of ballots for an election is announced and the successful candidates declared legally elected.

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declare out

1. withdraw from service; resign one ' s commission.

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deer

1. n. any of several species of North American reindeer, genus Rangifer, native to Canada, Alaska, and formerly to Maine and Mass.

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deer call

1. an instrument for imitating the call of deer to entice them within shooting range.

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deer crossing

1. a shallow stretch in a river or lake where caribou habitually cross, often usable by man as a ford.

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deer drive

1. a formerly-used method of hunting deer or caribou by driving them through a pair of converging fences into a pound (def. 1).

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Deer Eater

1. a member of a sub-tribe of the Chipewyan Indians.

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deer fence

1. two converging lines of fencing, as poles, piles of turf or brush, etc., used in early times in deer drives.

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deer fly

1. a blood-sucking horsefly of the genus Chrysops.

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deer hedge

1. two converging lines of fencing, as poles, piles of turf or brush, etc., used in early times in deer drives.

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deer lick

1.

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deer lodge

1. a lodge or camp for deer hunters.

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Deer Men

1. one of a group of Eskimos living inland in the District of Keewatin, west of Hudson Bay.

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deer post

1. a trading post near a plentiful supply of caribou.

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deer yard

1. a browsing area where a group of moose or deer in winter tread down the snow, remaining there for protection and warmth until the fodder within easy reach is exhausted.

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deer's tongue

1. the blazing star, Liatris sp.

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deer-grass

1. n. meadow beauty, Rhexia sp.

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deer-pass

1. n. a migration route followed by caribou.

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deer-pound

1. n. an enclosure in which deer or caribou were driven for slaughter.

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deerskin

1. n. caribou hide, widely used for clothing and tents by Indians and Eskimos in the North.

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deerskin bag

1. a sleeping-bag made of caribou hide.

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defence

1. n. in hockey and lacrosse, the players stationed in front of the goalkeeper to help him prevent the opposing team from scoring.

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defenceman

1. n. in hockey and lacrosse, one of the players who constitute a team's defence.

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degrade

1. n. a stop-over enforced by high winds, etc. (often in the phrase make a degrade).

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degraded

1. adj. See 1820 quote.

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deke ((n.))

1. n. a fake shot or movement intended to draw a defending player out of position. Also spelled deek.

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deke ((v.))

1. draw (a defending player) out of position by feinting, thus getting in a better position to score.

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delayed penalty

1. a penalty call for which the referee delays stopping play until the offending team gets possession of the puck, the imposition being signalled by the referee's raised arm.

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demi-canot

1. n. a light canoe about 20 feet long, used on certain low-water routes.

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demi-charge

1. n. that part of a canoe's load that was unloaded at a décharge (def. 1).

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demi-decharge

1. n. a partial unloading of a canoe to enable it to pass a shallow or dangerous place.

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demob

1. v. to demobilize.

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democrat

1. n. a light, two-horse wagon, having springs and two, sometimes three, seats.

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democrat wagon

1. a light, two-horse wagon, having springs and two, sometimes three, seats.

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demoiselle

1. n. a curiously-shaped pillar of clay, or cemented gravel, or other material, caused by erosion.

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denticare plan

1. n. a dental healthcare plan for children of low-income families offered by some provincial governments.

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depanneur

1. n. a neighbourhood convenience store (see Image 1) .

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department

1. n. the largest of the administrative districts of a fur company.

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department store

1. a large store organized into departments, each one of which sells a particular type of merchandise.

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departmental store

1. a large store organized into departments, each one of which sells a particular type of merchandise.

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departure

1. n. the departure of one or more persons from a post.

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deposit

1. n. a sum of money required to be put up by a candidate for election to Parliament or to a Legislature as evidence of his good faith, the money to be forfeited to the Crown should the candidate fail to poll half as many votes as the person elected.

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depot

1. n. a trading post which also served as a warehouse for supplies for other posts.

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depot farm

1. a farm, operated by a lumber company or privately owned, supplying fresh meat and vegetables, oats, etc., to lumber camps and often serving as a repository for supplies.

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depot farmer

1. the owner or the man in charge of a depot farm.

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depouille

1. n. a layer of choice fat found between the skin and muscles of a well-fed animal, especially along the back.

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deputy

1. n. a member of the Legislative Assembly.

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deputy reeve

1. in a municipality headed by a reeve, a member of council who acts as chairman in the reeve's absence.

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deputy sheriff

1. a court official who acts as assistant to a sheriff.

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deputy town reeve

1. in a municipality headed by a reeve, a member of council who acts as chairman in the reeve's absence.

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derby

1. n. a race with dog-sleds, canoes, etc.

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derouine

1. n. a trading trip for furs; trade carried on at an Indian camp away from the post.

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Deserted Acadian

1. one of the colonists abandoned in Acadia by the French after the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713.

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Deserted French

1. n. one of the colonists abandoned in Acadia by the French after the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713.

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designated import

1. n. a non-Canadian player whose participation in the game is limited according to the current CFL rule book.

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destitute rations

1. relief issues of food made available to needy Indians.

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detachment

1. n. in the North West Mounted Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the smallest administrative unit; a police post.

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detroit

1. n. narrows; a strait.

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Detroiter

1. n. a person in the employ of the Gregory, McLeod Company, a fur-trading concern having its base at Detroit, absorbed by the North-West Company in 1787.

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deuce

1. n. a two-dollar bank note.

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devant

1. n. the bowsman in a canoe; one of the two bouts.

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development road

1. one of a system of access roads intended to advance the development of natural resources.

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devil

1. n. a large fur-bearing animal, Gulo luscus, of the northern forests and tundra, noted for its guile and craftiness.

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Devil of the Woods

1. a large fur-bearing animal, Gulo luscus, of the northern forests and tundra, noted for its guile and craftiness.

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devil snatcher

1. See quote.

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devil's club

1. a shrub, Oplopanax horridus, of western Canada, having large leaves, a prickly stem and conspicuous red berries.

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devil's tobacco

1. See quote.

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devil's whiskey-jack

1. the great northern shrike, Lanius borealis.

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devil's wood

1. the vine maple of British Columbia, Acer circinatum. Also called mountain maple.

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DEW Line

1. a 3,000-mile network of radar stations and airstrips for interceptor aircraft, extending from Point Barrow, Alaska, to Baffin Island and intended for defence against attack by air.

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dew worm

1. a large earthworm, Lumbricus sp.

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dewatter-berry

1. n.

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dewberry

1. n. any one of several species of Rubus having a raspberry-like fruit.

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dewotter-berry

1. n.

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Dextre

1. n. a remote-controlled manipulator on the International Space Station (see Image 1).

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diable

1. n. a stone boat; drag; go-devil.

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diamond hitch

1. a complicated hitch used in securing a pack on a horse, about forty feet of rope being thrown back and forth over the animal in such a way that it forms a diamond pattern on top.

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diamond willow

1. an abnormal growth of the stem of any species of willow, resulting in a diamond or diaper pattern in the grain, much favored for making walking-sticks.

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dickey

1. n. a hooded outer garment of fur or other material. See picture at atigi.

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dickey-flap

1. n. a protective flap at the neck-opening of a dickey.

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dig up the hatchet

1.

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Digby chicken

1. a small smoke-cured herring.

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Digby chips

1. n. fillets of herring, dried and salted.

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Digby herring

1. n. a small smoke-cured herring.

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digging stick

1. a specially shaped implement, usually of yew wood, used by western Indian women for digging up roots and clams, and in primitive agriculture.

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dike

1. n. an earthwork embankment equipped with aboiteaus to protect the land from the high tides of the Bay of Fundy.

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dike(d) land(s)

1. the fertile sea meadows protected by a dike (def. 1).

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dike(d) marsh

1. the fertile sea meadows protected by a dike (def. 1).

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dilworth

1. n. a school textbook, "A New Guide to the English Tongue," long used in the Maritimes.

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dime

1. n. an American ten-cent piece.

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dime party

1. a social affair, entry to which required a donation of a dime, usually for charity.

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dime society

1. a society that held dime parties in aid of charity.

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dipper

1. n. any container for berry picking; often a small saucepan or pot.

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dipsy-doodle

1. adj. a quick series of moves by the puck-carrier involving feints and expert stickhandling.

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direct action man

1. a strong-arm bully employed during elections in colonial days to intimidate supporters of an opposing political party.

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dirt-igloo

1. n. an Eskimo house built of rocks and sod, often with a driftwood roof.

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dirty ice

1. n. a mass of densely packed pieces of heavy, sludgy ice, especially sea ice.

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Dirty Thirties

1. the depression years of the 1930's, so called in reference to the dust storms and drought on the prairies.

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disallow

1. v. invoke disallowance

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disallowance

1. n. the power, formerly held by the British government to veto provincial or federal legislation, ordinances, appointments, etc., made in Canada.

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disc number

1. n. an identification number on a leather or metal disc that was issued to Inuit people by the federal government of Canada.

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discharge ((n.))

1. n.

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discharge ((v.))

1. v. unload part of the cargo of a canoe in order to get over a shallow place or to avoid bad water; make a discharge.

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discovering party

1. a group of scouts; a reconnaissance party.

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discovery

1. n. a scouting or exploring trip.

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discovery claim

1. n. the first or original claim staked on a creek, all other claims being recorded as above discovery or below discovery.

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Discovery Day

1. See quotes.

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discovery post

1. the first of four squared posts marking the limits of a mineral claim, which shows the name of the claimant and the date of discovery.

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discovery well

1. the first successful well drilled in a new oil field.

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dish soap

1. n. liquid detergent used to wash dishes.

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disking

1. n. a game patterned on curling and played on a marked polished floor with wooden disks, 8 inches in diameter and an inch thick.

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disloyalist

1. n. a resident of Canada who left for the United States during the War of 1812.

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Distant Early Warning Line

1. n. a 3,000-mile network of radar stations and airstrips for interceptor aircraft, extending from Point Barrow, Alaska, to Baffin Island and intended for defence against attack by air.

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district

1. n. a large unorganized or partly organized frontier area established primarily for judicial purposes.

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district council

1. in United Canada, the elected administrative body of a district, as established by the Municipal Act of 1841.

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district court

1. a court dealing with minor criminal and civil cases within a specific area.

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district master

1. See 1937 quote.

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district school

1. a publicly supported elementary school.

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district town

1. the town in which the seat of municipal government is located.

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district warden

1. the presiding officer of a district council, equivalent to the modern county warden.

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ditch duster

1. a machine for blowing dust into frozen ditches to free them from ice and snow.

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divide

1. n. a watershed.

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dividend

1. n. in Alberta, a payment made to citizens of ten years' residence, paid by the Social Credit government from gas and oil royalties.

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division court

1. a lesser court concerned with minor civil actions only.

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division point

1. a place where a railway has its headquarters for a given administrative district, usually at the boundary of two such districts or divisions.

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division school

1. a publicly supported elementary school.

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division station

1. a place where a railway has its headquarters for a given administrative district, usually at the boundary of two such districts or divisions.

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divisional point

1. a place where a railway has its headquarters for a given administrative district, usually at the boundary of two such districts or divisions.

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do down

1. preserve, as fruit and vegetables.

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doater

1. n.

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dog

1. n. a marmot, Cynomys ludovicianus, once common on the southern prairies.

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dog bear

1. a male bear.

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dog brigade

1. a brigade of dog teams.

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dog cariole

1. in the North and Northwest, a light tobogganlike dog sled into which a single passenger or a load is laced securely, the dog-driver following behind. See picture at cariole.

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dog carriole

1.

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dog corral

1. an enclosure in which sled dogs are penned when not working.

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dog derby

1. a race in which the contestants are dog teams and drivers.

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dog feast

1. among certain Indian tribes, a ceremonial feast in which dogs were eaten to propitiate evil spirits.

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dog harness

1. the gear by which sled dogs are harnessed to sleds.

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dog moccasin

1. a simple leather or canvas bag tied on the feet of sled dogs to protect their paws.

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dog packet

1. a small dog-train (def. 4) broken off from a brigade for a side trip to small posts.

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dog pemmican

1. inferior pemmican prepared for use as dog-feed.

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dog race

1. a race in which the contestants are dog teams and drivers.

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dog salmon

1. a large salmon of the Pacific coast, Oncorhynchus keta.

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dog shoe

1. n. a simple leather or canvas bag tied on the feet of sled dogs to protect their paws.

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dog teamster

1. n. a person who drives a dog team.

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dog traineau

1. a dog-sled and the dog-team together.

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dog travail

1. a simple wheel-less conveyance originally used by the Indians and made of two poles on which was a platform or net for holding a load, the contrivance being pulled by a dog. See picture at travois.

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dog travois

1. a simple wheel-less conveyance originally used by the Indians and made of two poles on which was a platform or net for holding a load, the contrivance being pulled by a dog. See picture at travois.

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dog-bell

1. n. one of the bells on a sled-dog's harness.

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dog-boot

1. n. a simple leather or canvas bag tied on the feet of sled dogs to protect their paws.

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dog-driver

1. n. a person who drives a dog team.

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dog-eating

1. n. among certain Indian tribes, a ceremonial feast in which dogs were eaten to propitiate evil spirits

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dog-hood

1. n. an adult male hood seal.

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dog-leg fence

1. a type of rail fence.

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dog-line

1. n. one of the leather or webbing traces by which dogs are hitched to a sled.

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dog-musher

1. n. a person who drives a dog team.

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dog-pack

1. n. a bag, usually one of a pair, carried by a pack dog.

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dog-path

1. n. a trail used by sled dogs.

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dog-puncher

1. n. a person who drives a dog team.

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dog-road

1. n. a trail used by sled dogs.

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dog-runner

1. n. a person who drives a dog team.

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dog-skinner

1. n. a person who drives a dog team.

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dog-sled

1. n. a sled drawn by a team of dogs.

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dog-sledge

1. n. a sled drawn by a team of dogs. See picture at dog-sled.

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dog-sleigh

1. n. a sled drawn by a team of dogs. See picture at dog-sled.

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dog-team

1. n. a number of sled dogs (2 to 20) hitched to a sled or toboggan.

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dog-team race

1. a race in which the contestants are dog teams and drivers.

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dog-team taxi (cab)

1. a dog-sled employed as a taxi.

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dog-toboggan

1. n. in the North and Northwest, a light tobogganlike dog sled into which a single passenger or a load is laced securely, the dog-driver following behind. See picture at cariole (def. 2a).

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dog-trail

1. n. a trail used by sled dogs.

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dog-train

1. n. a dog-sled and the dog-team together.

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dog-wolf

1. n. an adult male wolf.

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dog-yard

1. n. an enclosure in which sled dogs are penned when not working.

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dogan

1. n. an Irish Roman Catholic.

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dogger

1. n. a worker responsible for fixing and adjusting log dogs.

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doggery

1. n. a low-class drinking place; a cheap saloon.

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doggie

1. n.

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dogie

1. n. a range-herd calf that has lost its mother. Also dogy.

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dogsled race

1. a race in which the contestants are dog teams and drivers.

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dogsleigh race

1. a race in which the contestants are dog teams and drivers.

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dollar

1. n. in colonial days (until 1858 officially), the Spanish dollar, a silver coin valued at so many shillings Halifax currency or York currency.

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dollar bill

1. a bank note having the face value of one dollar.

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dollar house

1. an inn or rest house at which any meal costs a dollar.

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dollar native

1. an Eskimo of the Mackenzie delta region who demands high pay for his services.

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dollar piece

1. a silver dollar.

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Dollar Yankee

1. a citizen of the United States.

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Dollardom

1. n. the United States, so called because of the reputed love of the dollar among the citizens of that country.

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Dolly

1. n. a char, Salvelinus malma spectabilis, characterized by reddish-orange spots on an olive-green skin, found in western lakes and rivers and on the Pacific coast.

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Dolly Varden

1. a char, Salvelinus malma spectabilis, characterized by reddish-orange spots on an olive-green skin, found in western lakes and rivers and on the Pacific coast.

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Dolly Varden char

1.

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Dolly Varden trout

1. a char, Salvelinus malma spectabilis, characterized by reddish-orange spots on an olive-green skin, found in western lakes and rivers and on the Pacific coast.

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domain(e)

1. n. in Quebec, a farm belonging to a seigniory; manorial farm.

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dome fastener

1. n. a fastener consisting of a press-stud and socket (see Image 1).

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dominie

1. n. a school-teacher, especially a Scot.

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Dominion

1. n. the name of the Confederation of Canada as created by the British North America Act in 1867.

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Dominion Day

1. a statutory holiday celebrated annually on July 1 in commemoration of the creation of the Dominion of Canada, July 1, 1867.

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Dominion Government

1. the Government of Canada; the federal government whose seat is in Ottawa.

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Dominion Holiday

1. a statutory holiday celebrated annually on July 1 in commemoration of the creation of the Dominion of Canada, July 1, 1867.

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Dominion note

1. a bank note issued by the federal government.

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Dominion of Canada

1. the name of the Confederation of Canada as created by the British North America Act in 1867.

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Dominion Parliament

1. the House of Commons and Senate in Ottawa; the federal Parliament.

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Dominion Police

1. a federal police organization absorbed in 1920 into the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

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don

1. n. a senior student or, occasionally, a faculty member, who lives in a university residence and offers student services; a residence assistant.

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donair

1. n. sliced meat cooked on an upright spit, served in pita bread with vegetables, sauces and seasoning (see Image 1).

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donation feast

1. n. See 1964 quote at potlatch (def. 2a).

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donation party

1. a social gathering held by members of a church at which donations were made for the support of the minister.

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donation visit

1. a social gathering held by members of a church at which donations were made for the support of the minister.

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done

1. followed by a noun or noun phrase denoting completed action, e.g. be done dinner, be done my homework.

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donkey jammer

1. the operator of a donkey engine; donkeyman.

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donkey puncher

1.

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donnaconna(board)

1. n. a type of fibreboard.

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doozer

1. n. something extraordinary in size, interest, or strength; often in the phrase "a doozer of a . . ."; whopper.

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dope

1. n. a preparation for applying to the skin to repel insect pests such as mosquitoes and black flies.

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dormeuse

1. n. a modification of the cariole (def. lb), adapted for sleeping.

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dory

1. n. the pickerel, Stizostedion vitreum, of the Great Lakes system.

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doryman

1. n. a person who fishes from a dory, which is a flat-bottomed fishing boat (see Image 1).

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doré

1. n. the pickerel, Stizostedion vitreum, of the Great Lakes system.

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doter

1. n. an old seal, especially a harp.

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double bark camp

1. a bivouac shelter large enough to hold two persons.

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double buckboard

1. a buckboard drawn by two horses.

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double camp

1. a bivouac shelter large enough to hold two persons.

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double decker

1. two bunks built one above the other.

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double kayak

1. a two-man kayak with two separate cockpits.

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double mooley

1. a kind of skate having double runners and resembling a bobskate.

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double north canoe

1. a large freight canoe, measuring about 40 feet and capable of carrying 4 to 5 tons, used for the voyage from Montreal to the Grand Portage.

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double sleigh

1. a wide passenger sleigh having double front and back seats, drawn by one or two horses and riding on two sets of bobs.

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double spruce

1. See quotes.

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double takeout

1. a shot which hits two of an opponent's rocks, driving both out of the house.

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double tent

1. a bivouac shelter large enough to hold two persons.

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double window

1. a storm window; a removable glazed frame put on in the fall and taken off in the spring, to help keep out the cold.

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double-bee

1. n. See quotes.

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double-decker bunk

1. two bunks built one above the other.

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double-double

1. n. a cup of coffee with two servings of cream and sugar.

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double-fisting

1. adv. qualifying the verb: holding two items, one in each hand, usually beverages or food.

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double-fronted township

1. a township two of whose boundaries are base lines of different concessions.

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double-jack

1. n. a heavy long-handled sledgehammer.

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double-jacking

1. n. a method of drilling in which one man strikes with a double-jack a drill-steel held and rotated by his mate.

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double-trip

1. v. take part of a load, leave it, and return for the rest; transport a load in two trips.

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Douglas

1. n. Pseudotsuga taxifolia, the largest tree native to Canada.

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Douglas Day

1. in British Columbia, November 19, a day commemorating Sir James Douglas, 1803-1877, Governor of British Columbia 1858-1864.

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Douglas fir

1. Pseudotsuga taxifolia, the largest tree native to Canada.

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Douglas pine

1. Pseudotsuga taxifolia, the largest tree native to Canada.

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Douglas spruce

1. Pseudotsuga taxifolia, the largest tree native to Canada.

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Douk

1. n. a member of a Christian sect founded in Russia in the 18th century, several thousand of whom settled in Western Canada at the end of the 19th century.

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Doukhobor

1. n. a member of a Christian sect founded in Russia in the 18th century, several thousand of whom settled in Western Canada at the end of the 19th century.

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down

1. n. one of the three attempts a team has to advance the ball ten yards from the place where the ball was previously grounded; the duration of such an attempt.

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down below

1. in or to central Canada or the Maritimes, usually Ontario (from the point of view of persons in the West and Northwest).

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down east

1.

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down East

1. in or to the Maritimes, especially Nova Scotia (particularly from the point of view of someone in Central Canada).

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down logs

1. trees that have been blown down or felled by other natural causes.

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down north

1.

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down North

1. to, or northward along, the Labrador coast.

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down south

1. adv. further south; often the highly populated belt close to the Canada-US border.

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down timber

1. trees that have been blown down or felled by other natural causes.

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Down-Easter

1. n. a native of eastern Canada.

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down-island

1. adv. moving further south on Vancouver Island.

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download

1. v. transfer costs to a lower level of government.

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dozer boat

1. n. a small tug used to control a boom of logs under tow or in the booming grounds.

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dozy

1. adj. dim-witted or lazy.

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draegerman

1. n. a coal miner trained in underground rescue work and the use of special equipment; a mine rescuer.

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drag

1. n. the tail end of a moving herd of cattle or horses.

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drag end

1. the tail end of a moving herd of cattle or horses.

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dragger

1. n. See 1963 quote.

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dragline

1. n. a strong line or rope used in tracking (def. 1).

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dram

1. n. a detachable component of a timber raft, those on the Ottawa drives comprising some 25 cribs made up of logs or square timbers lashed or chained together and of appropriate size to shoot the timber slides.

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draught

1. n. a load of dried codfish equal to two quintals.

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draw ((n.))

1. n. a gully; ravine.

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draw ((v.))

1. v. receive a grant of land from the government.

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draw game

1. a style of play in which the curlers aim their stones with a view to having them curl into the house, as opposed to aiming with intent to knock the opposing stones out of play.

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draw line

1. the main line by which a dog sled is drawn, the traces of the several dogs being attached to this line in what is called a fan hitch. See picture at fan hitch.

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draw treaty

1. of Indians, qualify for and receive treaty money.

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drawmaster

1. n. the official in charge of organizing a bonspiel.

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Dreamer

1. n. an Indian who claimed the power of divination.

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dreaming stage

1. a tree platform used by Indians to commune with their special spirits during the ritual marking progress from puberty to manhood.

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dress

1. n. an outfit of clothing presented to an Indian on a ceremonial occasion by a fur company or a government agency as a mark of recognition.

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dressing-shack

1. n. a heated shack near an outdoor skating rink in which to change clothes.

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dried fish

1. dried and, sometimes, smoked fish, as whitefish, long used for food for both men and dogs by the Indians and Eskimos.

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dried meat

1. See 1857 quote.

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dried salmon

1. salmon filleted, smoked, and dried, once a staple in the diet of the British Columbia Indians.

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drift boat

1. a small fishing boat used in tending drift nets.

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drift fence

1. a fence erected to prevent cattle or horses from straying.

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drift storm

1. a snowstorm in which the snow is whipped into drifts by the wind.

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drift-ice

1. n. small ice masses drifting in the sea.

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drift-pan

1. n. a piece of drift-ice.

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drifter

1. n. a snowstorm in which the snow is whipped into drifts by the wind.

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driftpile

1. n. a large pile of driftwood in a river.

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driftwood pile

1. a large pile of driftwood in a river.

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drill hall

1. a building with a spacious open floor where the militia perform marching and other exercises.

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drill shed

1. a building with a spacious open floor where the militia perform marching and other exercises.

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drilling reservation

1. a permit granting drilling rights on a defined area of land.

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drinking bar

1. n. See salooon 1871 quote.

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drinking box

1. n. a box formed of paper, polyethylene, and aluminum foil for holding liquid (juice, milk, wine), often with an attached straw.

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drips

1. n. a kind of syrup.

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drivable

1. adj. of a river, suitable for driving logs.

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drive ((n.))

1. n. a specific collection of logs being floated downstream at high water from the timber limits to a mill or shipping point.

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drive ((v.))

1. v. move a mass of logs by floating them downstream at high water in the spring; manage or control logs being moved in this way.

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drive camp

1. n. a temporary camp set up during a drive, n. (def. lb).

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drive hunting

1. n. a method of hunting deer by which the animal is driven, usually by dogs, until it seeks refuge in a stream or lake, where, at the point of exhaustion, it is easily killed.

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drive steel

1. work with a steel drill and sledge; hence, work as a miner.

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drive-barn

1. n. a shed in which farm vehicles and machinery are stored when not in use.

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drive-house

1. n. a shed in which farm vehicles and machinery are stored when not in use.

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drive-shed

1. n. a shed in which farm vehicles and machinery are stored when not in use.

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driveboat

1. n. a shallow-draft rowboat used in driving logs.

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driver

1. n. a man who takes part in the process of floating or driving logs.

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driveway

1. n. a scenic highway, especially a city thoroughfare, the sides of which are landscaped and planted with trees and flowers.

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driving

1. n. the process or practice of floating logs downstream at high water.

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driving boat

1. a shallow-draft rowboat used in driving logs.

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driving-shed

1. n. a shed in which farm vehicles and machinery are stored when not in use.

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drogue

1. n. a clump of trees, especially evergreens; a copse.

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droke

1. n. a clump of trees, especially evergreens; a copse.

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drop pass

1. a type of passing play in which a puck-carrier leaves the puck for a team-mate following him, after the defending players have been drawn out of position.

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drop the puck

1. expression the dropping of a hockey puck onto the ice to signal the start of a game.

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drop-log

1. n. in a deadfall n. (def.1), the log which falls on the animal taking the bait.

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Drought Area

1. a term applied to the southern regions of the Prairie Provinces, especially during the 1930's.

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droughtlands

1. n. a term applied to the southern regions of the Prairie Provinces, especially during the 1930's.

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drouine

1. n. a trading trip for furs; trade carried on at an Indian camp away from the post.

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drowned lands

1. low-lying areas liable to flooding.

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druggist store

1. a shop in which prescriptions are filled and patent medicines sold, often having a great variety of other goods for sale.

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drugstore

1. n. a shop in which prescriptions are filled and patent medicines sold, often having a great variety of other goods for sale.

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drum ((n.))

1. n. a heating device used in German pioneer homes.

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drum ((v.))

1. v. of the male ruffed grouse, produce a loud reverberating noise by beating the wings.

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drum dance

1. an Eskimo dance accompanied by drums.

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drum oven

1. a cylindrical bake-oven built into a stove pipe.

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drum song

1. among Eskimos, a song accompanied by drum music.

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drum stove

1. a heating device used in German pioneer homes.

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drumming

1. n. of the male ruffed grouse, the making of a loud reverberating noise by beating the wings, especially in the mating ritual.

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drunken forest

1. in permafrost regions, a group of trees tilted in various directions by natural forces acting on their shallow root systems.

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dry ((adj.))

1. adj. forbidding the sale and use of intoxicating beverages.

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dry ((n.))

1. n. a person who advocates prohibition of the sale of intoxicating beverages.

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Dry Area

1. See quote.

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dry beaver

1. See 1957 quote in parchment beaver.

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dry bee

1. a bee at which no liquor was served.

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Dry Belt

1. on the Prairies, an extensive region of low precipitation, roughly bounded by Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, and Medicine Hat, Alberta.

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dry diet

1. n. common winter provisions consisting of dried foods (e.g. biscuits, dried fish).

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dry diggings

1. gold claims away from the bed of a stream.

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dry farm

1. n. a farm in a semi-arid region operated without irrigation.

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dry farming

1. n. a technique of farming in a semi-arid region without recourse to irrigation.

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dry fish

1. dried and, sometimes, smoked fish, as whitefish, long used for food for both men and dogs by the Indians and Eskimos.

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dry fishery

1. a method of commercial fishing involving the drying of the catch on flakes.

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dry fishing

1. a method of commercial fishing involving the drying of the catch on flakes.

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dry goods

1. clothing, yard goods, etc.

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dry grad

1. n. an alcohol-free party in celebration of high school graduation.

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dry herd

1. See quote.

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dry meat

1. See 1857 quote in dried meat (def. 1).

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dry permafrost

1. See quote.

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dry portage

1. a portage which one can traverse dry-shod.

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dry sink

1. See quote.

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dry snye

1. a dry side channel which, when deepened and filled with water from a snye-dam served as a by-pass enabling raftsmen to avoid rapids.

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dry summer beaver

1. unprime, or inferior, skins of parchment beaver.

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dry the pot

1. finish what remains of the food.

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dry wash

1. a gully cut by erosion but with no stream in its bed.

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dry winter beaver

1. prime skins of parchment beaver.

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dry-bag

1. n. a waterproof bag in which spare clothing is kept while on the trail.

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dry-ki

1. n.

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dry-kill timber

1. See quote.

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dry-land

1. n. an area of low precipitation, such as the Dry Belt (def. 1).

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drying house

1. a building, such as a smokehouse, for drying and curing fish.

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drying stage

1. See flake 1883 quote.

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drying-beach

1. n. a beach for curing the catch taken by fishermen engaged in the dry fishery.

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drylander

1. n. a person who settled in a region of low precipitation, especially the Dry Belt (def. 1).

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dual nomination meeting

1. one party meeting to nominate candidates for both federal and provincial elections.

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dual riding

1. an electoral district that is represented in the House of Commons by two Members of Parliament or Members of the Legislative Assembly.

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dual-member constituency

1. a riding (def. 2) represented by two members of Parliament or of the legislative assembly.

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dubshot

1. n. See quote.

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ducent

1. n. the crewman of a canoe or York boat whose position is in the bow.

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duck camp

1. a hunting lodge providing accommodation for duck hunters.

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duck factory

1. in the southern prairies, an area of sloughs where ducks nest.

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duckish

1. exp. dusk or twilight.

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ducks and drakes

1. See quote.

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dude

1. n. a non-westerner or a newly-arrived settler who affects stylish eastern clothes.

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dude ranch

1. a ranch which takes paying guests, providing riding, barbecues, square dances, etc.

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duffel

1. n.

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Duffield(s)

1. n. a very closely woven woollen cloth.

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duffle

1. n. a very closely woven woollen cloth.

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duffle dickie

1. a parka or atigi made of duffle.

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duffle moccasin

1. n. a warm ankle-length sock, or liner, of duffle worn inside moccasins, mukluks, etc. and usually folded down at the top.

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duffle neap

1. n. a warm ankle-length sock, or liner, of duffle worn inside moccasins, mukluks, etc. and usually folded down at the top.

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duffle slipper

1. see duffle moccasin

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duffle sock

1. n. a warm ankle-length sock, or liner, of duffle worn inside moccasins, mukluks, etc. and usually folded down at the top.

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duffle stocking

1. n. a long stocking of duffle worn over inner socks inside moccasins, mukluks, etc.

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duffle vamp

1. a warm ankle-length sock, or liner, of duffle worn inside moccasins, mukluks, etc. and usually folded down at the top.

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duffle-bag

1. n. a large bag of heavy cloth or canvas, used for carrying personal belongings.

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dugout

1. n. a canoe hewn from a single log

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dugout canoe

1. n. a canoe hewn from a single log.

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Dukhobor

1. n.

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dumb stove

1.

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dummy

1. n. an imitation nipple used to soothe babies and toddlers; a soother, pacifier.

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dump ((n.))

1. n. the pile of gold-bearing dirt excavated and waiting to be washed in the sluice boxes.

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dump ((v.))

1. v. drop a pile of logs from the bank into the water.

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dump car

1. n. a self-unloading gondola railway car; also, in mining, a smaller car made to drop its load by levers or by tipping.

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dump-and-chase

1. n. an offensive move in which a team shoots, "dumps", the puck into the other team's zone and then rushes, "chases", after it. See animated video.

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dump-box

1. n. a box used in washing the dump.

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dun ((adj.))

1. adj. become (or go) dun, of cured codfish, turn dingy brown and soft.

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dun ((n.))

1. n. an inferior grade of cured codfish, soft and dingy brown.

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dunch

1. n. doughy, soggy bread.

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duo-tang

1. n. a folder made of card stock or plastic in various colours, with three fasteners to hold down loose-leaf paper (see Image 1).

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duplex

1. n. a building consisting of two dwellings under one roof, either side by side or one below the other.

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Durham boat

1. n. a river-boat having a false keel and shallow draught, somewhat less than 100 feet in length and propelled by sails or poles, much used in the early 19th century on the St. Lawrence and its tributaries for freight and passengers.

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Durhamite

1. n. a person supporting the reforms advocated by Lord Durham in his Report of 1839.

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dust

1. n. gold dust.

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Dust Bowl

1. a region subject to dust storms in arid years, specifically the Dry Belt.

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dust hawk

1. a horse driven in sulky races.

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dust-bowl days

1. the depression years of the 1930's, so called in reference to the dust storms and drought on the prairies.

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dust-bowl years

1. see dust-bowl days.

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Dutch ((adj.))

1. adj. of or having to do with settlers of German extraction.

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Dutch ((n.))

1. n. a settler of German extraction, especially during colonial days, as a Pennsylvania Dutch Loyalist or as in the Lunenburg region of Nova Scotia.

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Dutch ((v.))

1. v. provide with a Dutch-cut

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Dutch barn

1. n. a type of bank barn, used by settlers in Upper Canada, a style introduced by American settlers, who learned the design from the Pennsylvania Dutch.

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Dutch lever

1. See quote.

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Dutch mess

1. See quote.

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Dutch oven

1. a cast-iron pot with a tight-fitting lid for baking food in the hot ashes of a fire.

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Dutch sleigh

1. a two-seater sleigh on long, high runners.

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Dutch-cut

1. n. a style of haircut such that the hair, combed straight back, is bobbed on a level with the ear lobes.

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dutchie

1. n. a square doughnut with sugar glazing (see Image 1).

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Dutchman

1. n. a settler of German extraction, especially during colonial days, as a Pennsylvania Dutch Loyalist or as in the Lunenburg region of Nova Scotia.

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déboulé

1. n. a rock slide; avalanche.

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débâcle

1. n. the annual thrusting forward and expansion of river ice during break-up, with special reference to the St. Lawrence River, where the phenomenon was accompanied with much flooding and considerable danger.

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décharge

1. n. a shallow place where a boat or canoe had to be partly unloaded before it could proceed.

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dégradé

1. adj. See degraded 1820 quote.

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